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Security Council : Report of the Secretary-General on the Request of Nepal for United Nations Assistance in Support of its Peace Process (3 January 2008)
Abstract:
1. The present report is submitted pursuant to Security Council resolution 1740 (2007) in which the Council established the United Nations Mission in Nepal (UNMIN) in response to the request of the Government of Nepal and the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), or CPN(M), for United Nations support for the peace process. UNMIN was established as a special political mission with a mandate to monitor the management of arms and armed personnel of CPN(M) and the Nepal Army, assist in monitoring ceasefire arrangements, provide technical support for the conduct of the election of a Constituent Assembly in a free and fair atmosphere and provide a small team of electoral monitors. 2. This report reviews the progress of the peace process and the implementation of the mandate of UNMIN since my report to the Council of 18 October 2007 (S/2007/612). 3. In my last report to the Council, I referred to the 5 October 2007 decision of the Seven-Party Alliance (SPA) to postpone the Constituent Assembly election, scheduled for 22 November, without setting a new date. It was the second postponement of the election, which had originally been planned for June 2007. Among the key obstacles were the Maoists’ demands for the declaration of a republic before the Constituent Assembly election and the adoption of a fully proportional representation (FPR) system of election instead of the mixed system, as agreed earlier, of first-past-the-post for half the seats and proportional representation for the other half. After protracted negotiations, the Seven-Party Alliance reached an initial agreement on 15 December to hold the election by the end of the current Nepali year (12 April 2008), followed on 23 December by a wide-ranging 23-point agreement re-establishing the basis for their cooperation. 4. The second postponement of the election was in many ways sealed when CPN(M) withdrew from the Seven-Party Alliance Government on 18 September in order to press for its 22-point demands. Two of these demands, the declaration of a republic and a fully proportional representation electoral system, were further advanced in November as motions in a Maoist-petitioned special session of the interim Legislature-Parliament. Despite the strong opposition of the Nepali Congress (NC), on 4 November the special session adopted motions on these two issues, a result of last-minute agreement between the Maoists and the Communist Party of Nepal (Unified Marxist-Leninist) (UML). Though adopted by simple majority vote, they did not garner the two-thirds majority required for constitutional amendments, and the Nepali Congress continued to reject their implementation, maintaining that they were not legally binding. #SecurityCouncil #PeaceProcess #UML #ChildProtection #HumanRights
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
PEACE PROCESS, PEACE AGREEMENTS, MAOIST ARMY, CONSTITUTIONS, ELECTIONS, CEASEFIRES, ARMED FORCES, ARMIES, POLITICAL PLATFORMS, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, POLITICAL LEADERS, POLITICAL PARTIES, LEADERSHIP, CIVIL SOCIETY, GENDER, SOCIAL INCLUSION, CHILD PROTECTION, PUBLIC INFORMATION, HUMAN RIGHTS
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2008)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 81 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: MALIKA THAPA, Auditor:
...
Security Council:Report of the Secretary-General on the request of Nepal for United Nations Assistance in Support of its Peace Process (3 January 2008)
Abstract:
1. The present report is submitted pursuant to Security Council resolution 1740 (2007) in which the Council established the United Nations Mission in Nepal (UNMIN) in response to the request of the Government of Nepal and the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), or CPN(M), for United Nations support for the peace process. UNMIN was established as a special political mission with a mandate to monitor the management of arms and armed personnel of CPN(M) and the Nepal Army, assist in monitoring ceasefire arrangements, provide technical support for the conduct of the election of a Constituent Assembly in a free and fair atmosphere and provide a small team of electoral monitors. 2. This report reviews the progress of the peace process and the implementation of the mandate of UNMIN since my report to the Council of 18 October 2007 (S/2007/612). 3. In my last report to the Council, I referred to the 5 October 2007 decision of the Seven-Party Alliance (SPA) to postpone the Constituent Assembly election, scheduled for 22 November, without setting a new date. It was the second postponement of the election, which had originally been planned for June 2007. Among the key obstacles were the Maoists’ demands for the declaration of a republic before the Constituent Assembly election and the adoption of a fully proportional representation (FPR) system of election instead of the mixed system, as agreed earlier, of first-past-the-post for half the seats and proportional representation for the other half. After protracted negotiations, the Seven-Party Alliance reached an initial agreement on 15 December to hold the election by the end of the current Nepali year (12 April 2008), followed on 23 December by a wide-ranging 23-point agreement re-establishing the basis for their cooperation. 4. The second postponement of the election was in many ways sealed when CPN(M) withdrew from the Seven-Party Alliance Government on 18 September in order to press for its 22-point demands. Two of these demands, the declaration of a republic and a fully proportional representation electoral system, were further advanced in November as motions in a Maoist-petitioned special session of the interim Legislature-Parliament. Despite the strong opposition of the Nepali Congress (NC), on 4 November the special session adopted motions on these two issues, a result of last-minute agreement between the Maoists and the Communist Party of Nepal (Unified Marxist-Leninist) (UML). Though adopted by simple majority vote, they did not garner the two-thirds majority required for constitutional amendments, and the Nepali Congress continued to reject their implementation, maintaining that they were not legally binding.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
PEACE PROCESS, PEACE AGREEMENTS, MAOIST ARMY, CONSTITUTIONS, ELECTIONS, CEASEFIRES, ARMED FORCES, ARMIES, POLITICAL PLATFORMS, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, POLITICAL LEADERS, POLITICAL PARTIES, LEADERSHIP, CIVIL SOCIETY, GENDER, SOCIAL INCLUSION, CHILD PROTECTION, PUBLIC INFORMATION, HUMAN RIGHTS
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2008)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 81 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: ANG1EE12, Auditor:
...
Security Council:Report of the Secretary-General on the request of Nepal for United Nations Assistance in Support of its Peace Process (3 January 2008)
Abstract:
1. The present report is submitted pursuant to Security Council resolution 1740 (2007) in which the Council established the United Nations Mission in Nepal (UNMIN) in response to the request of the Government of Nepal and the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), or CPN(M), for United Nations support for the peace process. UNMIN was established as a special political mission with a mandate to monitor the management of arms and armed personnel of CPN(M) and the Nepal Army, assist in monitoring ceasefire arrangements, provide technical support for the conduct of the election of a Constituent Assembly in a free and fair atmosphere and provide a small team of electoral monitors. 2. This report reviews the progress of the peace process and the implementation of the mandate of UNMIN since my report to the Council of 18 October 2007 (S/2007/612). 3. In my last report to the Council, I referred to the 5 October 2007 decision of the Seven-Party Alliance (SPA) to postpone the Constituent Assembly election, scheduled for 22 November, without setting a new date. It was the second postponement of the election, which had originally been planned for June 2007. Among the key obstacles were the Maoists’ demands for the declaration of a republic before the Constituent Assembly election and the adoption of a fully proportional representation (FPR) system of election instead of the mixed system, as agreed earlier, of first-past-the-post for half the seats and proportional representation for the other half. After protracted negotiations, the Seven-Party Alliance reached an initial agreement on 15 December to hold the election by the end of the current Nepali year (12 April 2008), followed on 23 December by a wide-ranging 23-point agreement re-establishing the basis for their cooperation. 4. The second postponement of the election was in many ways sealed when CPN(M) withdrew from the Seven-Party Alliance Government on 18 September in order to press for its 22-point demands. Two of these demands, the declaration of a republic and a fully proportional representation electoral system, were further advanced in November as motions in a Maoist-petitioned special session of the interim Legislature-Parliament. Despite the strong opposition of the Nepali Congress (NC), on 4 November the special session adopted motions on these two issues, a result of last-minute agreement between the Maoists and the Communist Party of Nepal (Unified Marxist-Leninist) (UML). Though adopted by simple majority vote, they did not garner the two-thirds majority required for constitutional amendments, and the Nepali Congress continued to reject their implementation, maintaining that they were not legally binding.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
PEACE PROCESS, PEACE AGREEMENTS, MAOIST ARMY, CONSTITUTIONS, ELECTIONS, CEASEFIRES, ARMED FORCES, ARMIES, POLITICAL PLATFORMS, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, POLITICAL LEADERS, POLITICAL PARTIES, LEADERSHIP, CIVIL SOCIETY, GENDER, SOCIAL INCLUSION, CHILD PROTECTION, PUBLIC INFORMATION, HUMAN RIGHTS
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2008)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 81 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: ANG1EE12, Auditor:
...
Security Council:Report of the Secretary-General on the request of Nepal for United Nations Assistance in Support of its Peace Process (3 January 2008)
Abstract:
1. The present report is submitted pursuant to Security Council resolution 1740 (2007) in which the Council established the United Nations Mission in Nepal (UNMIN) in response to the request of the Government of Nepal and the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), or CPN(M), for United Nations support for the peace process. UNMIN was established as a special political mission with a mandate to monitor the management of arms and armed personnel of CPN(M) and the Nepal Army, assist in monitoring ceasefire arrangements, provide technical support for the conduct of the election of a Constituent Assembly in a free and fair atmosphere and provide a small team of electoral monitors. 2. This report reviews the progress of the peace process and the implementation of the mandate of UNMIN since my report to the Council of 18 October 2007 (S/2007/612). 3. In my last report to the Council, I referred to the 5 October 2007 decision of the Seven-Party Alliance (SPA) to postpone the Constituent Assembly election, scheduled for 22 November, without setting a new date. It was the second postponement of the election, which had originally been planned for June 2007. Among the key obstacles were the Maoists’ demands for the declaration of a republic before the Constituent Assembly election and the adoption of a fully proportional representation (FPR) system of election instead of the mixed system, as agreed earlier, of first-past-the-post for half the seats and proportional representation for the other half. After protracted negotiations, the Seven-Party Alliance reached an initial agreement on 15 December to hold the election by the end of the current Nepali year (12 April 2008), followed on 23 December by a wide-ranging 23-point agreement re-establishing the basis for their cooperation. 4. The second postponement of the election was in many ways sealed when CPN(M) withdrew from the Seven-Party Alliance Government on 18 September in order to press for its 22-point demands. Two of these demands, the declaration of a republic and a fully proportional representation electoral system, were further advanced in November as motions in a Maoist-petitioned special session of the interim Legislature-Parliament. Despite the strong opposition of the Nepali Congress (NC), on 4 November the special session adopted motions on these two issues, a result of last-minute agreement between the Maoists and the Communist Party of Nepal (Unified Marxist-Leninist) (UML). Though adopted by simple majority vote, they did not garner the two-thirds majority required for constitutional amendments, and the Nepali Congress continued to reject their implementation, maintaining that they were not legally binding.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
PEACE PROCESS, PEACE AGREEMENTS, MAOIST ARMY, CONSTITUTIONS, ELECTIONS, CEASEFIRES, ARMED FORCES, ARMIES, POLITICAL PLATFORMS, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, POLITICAL LEADERS, POLITICAL PARTIES, LEADERSHIP, CIVIL SOCIETY, GENDER, SOCIAL INCLUSION, CHILD PROTECTION, PUBLIC INFORMATION, HUMAN RIGHTS
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2008)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 81 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: ANG1EE12, Auditor:
...
Report of the Secretary-General on the request of Nepal for United Nations Assistance in Support of its Peace Process
Abstract:
The present report is submitted pursuant to Security Council resolution 1740 (2007) in which the Council established the United Nations Mission in Nepal (UNMIN) in response to the request of the Government of Nepal and the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), or CPN(M), for United Nations support for the peace process. UNMIN was established as a special political mission with a mandate to monitor the management of arms and armed personnel of CPN(M) and the Nepal Army, assist in monitoring ceasefire arrangements, provide technical support for the conduct of the election of a Constituent Assembly in a free and fair atmosphere and provide a small team of electoral monitors.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
PEACE PROCESS, SECURITY COUNCIL, SUPPORT, MANAGEMENT
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2008)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 81 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: FIDAH SHRESTHA, Auditor:
...