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Sectoral Activities Programme - Working Paper 187: Informal Labour In The Construction Industry In Nepal
Abstract:
It is now widely recognised that construction activity plays a vital role in the process of economic growth and development, both through its products (infrastructure, buildings) and through the employment created in the process of construction itself. The development of an efficient construction industry is an objective of policy in most countries. However, the focus of research and technical assistance to date has largely been upon the enterprises that comprise the sector – the contractors, subcontractors and consultants. Little attention has been paid to the labour force, about which often very little is known.This paper makes a start in redressing this imbalance. It presents the findings of a study of construction labour in Nepal. This is one of four studies of construction labour in various towns and cities in the developing world that were commissioned by the ILO in the year 2000. The focus of all of the studies is ‘informal labour’ in the construction sector.‘Informal labour’ is defined to include all construction workers who are employed on a casual or temporary basis without any proper form of contract, as well as those who work for themselves either alone or in small groups. The terms and conditions of employment are not regulated in any way and hence the workers have no protection from the law against dismissal and no social protection against sickness, old age or incapacity to work.In some low-income countries the vast majority of construction labourers have always been employed informally. In others, the number of such workers has increased dramatically in the past few decades, as competitive pressures have forced contractors to shed their directly employed labour force in favour of ‘outsourcing’ their labour requirements. Most labour is now engaged through subcontractors and other intermediaries. Subcontractors who are themselves employed for short periods of time, invariably employ workers on a short-term, often daily, basis. They generally avoid issuing the workers with written contracts and registering them with relevant authorities, in order to avoid the on-costs associated with employing labour. Indeed, the evasion of these additional costs is often the motivation for outsourcing in the first place.The studies provide a basis from which to assess the implications of the outsourcing of labour in the construction sector in low-income countries and to propose measures that promote good labour practice. It is hoped that they will stimulate further research on construction labour in other countries and towns, so that labour issues take centre stage in research into the construction industry and the requirements for its development.
Publisher: ILO Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
LABOUR, INFORMAL LABOUR, CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY, LABOUR ADMINISTRATION, LABOUR MARKET, LABOUR RELATIONS, LABOUR STATISTICS, LABOUR SUPPLY, REMITTANCES, INTERNATIONAL LABOUR, WORKING CONDITIONS, WORKERS RIGHTS, WORKERS EDUCATION, CHILD LABOUR, TRADE UNIONS, TRAINING PROGRAMMES, HUMAN RESOURCES, ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT, LABOUR LAW, CONSULTING ENGINEERS
Thematic Group:
ILO, (2002)
Thesaurus:
12.04.00 - Labour Relations
PDF | File Size: 1.63 MB   Download
Feeder: PRAJU SHRESTHA, Editor: ALISHATHAPALIYA, Auditor:
...
Sectoral Activities Programme - Working Paper 187: Informal Labour In The Construction Industry In Nepal
Abstract:
It is now widely recognised that construction activity plays a vital role in the process of economic growth and development, both through its products (infrastructure, buildings) and through the employment created in the process of construction itself. The development of an efficient construction industry is an objective of policy in most countries. However, the focus of research and technical assistance to date has largely been upon the enterprises that comprise the sector – the contractors, subcontractors and consultants. Little attention has been paid to the labour force, about which often very little is known. This paper makes a start in redressing this imbalance. It presents the findings of a study of construction labour in Nepal. This is one of four studies of construction labour in various towns and cities in the developing world that were commissioned by the ILO in the year 2000. The focus of all of the studies is ‘informal labour’ in the construction sector. ‘Informal labour’ is defined to include all construction workers who are employed on a casual or temporary basis without any proper form of contract, as well as those who work for themselves either alone or in small groups. The terms and conditions of employment are not regulated in any way and hence the workers have no protection from the law against dismissal and no social protection against sickness, old age or incapacity to work. In some low-income countries the vast majority of construction labourers have always been employed informally. In others, the number of such workers has increased dramatically in the past few decades, as competitive pressures have forced contractors to shed their directly employed labour force in favour of ‘outsourcing’ their labour requirements. Most labour is now engaged through subcontractors and other intermediaries. Subcontractors who are themselves employed for short periods of time, invariably employ workers on a short-term, often daily, basis. They generally avoid issuing the workers with written contracts and registering them with relevant authorities, in order to avoid the on-costs associated with employing labour. Indeed, the evasion of these additional costs is often the motivation for outsourcing in the first place. The studies provide a basis from which to assess the implications of the outsourcing of labour in the construction sector in low-income countries and to propose measures that promote good labour practice. It is hoped that they will stimulate further research on construction labour in other countries and towns, so that labour issues take centre stage in research into the construction industry and the requirements for its development.
Publisher: ILO Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
LABOUR, INFORMAL LABOUR, CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY, LABOUR ADMINISTRATION, LABOUR MARKET, LABOUR RELATIONS, LABOUR STATISTICS, LABOUR SUPPLY, REMITTANCES, INTERNATIONAL LABOUR, WORKING CONDITIONS, WORKERS RIGHTS, WORKERS EDUCATION, CHILD LABOUR, TRADE UNIONS, TRAINING PROGRAMMES, HUMAN RESOURCES, ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT, LABOUR LAW, CONSULTING ENGINEERS
Thematic Group:
ILO, (2002)
Thesaurus:
12.04.00 - Labour Relations
PDF | File Size: 1.63 MB   Download
Feeder: PRAJU SHRESTHA, Editor: , Auditor:
...