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Briefing by Ms Karin Landgren, Representative of the Secretary-General in Nepal: Meeting of the Security Council On the request of Nepal for United Nations assistance in support of its Peace Process (15 January 2010)
Abstract:
It is three years since this Council authorized the deployment of UNMIN, at the request of the then Seven-Party Alliance and the then-Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist, or CPN-M. The Mission's election-related tasks were completed, with some delays, in April 2008. UNMIN's continued support to the peace process, in particular through the monitoring of the management of arms and armies, and chairmanship of the Joint Monitoring Coordination Committee, has yet to be concluded. The report of the Secretary-General now with you [S/2010/17 of 7 January] reflects a turbulent period, with contentious actions and statements by the parties and warns of the grave danger that the prolonged period of polarization and growing confrontation poses to the peace process. The fragility of the peace process, and the concerns that it could derail, as I reported on 6 November, remain real. In the past weeks, however, the leaders of the principal parties have demonstrated a renewed urgency in focussing on core peace-related matters. The 28 May deadline for the promulgation of Nepal's new constitution, and the need to create the conditions that will allow UNMIN's role to be brought to an orderly end, have generated intense discussion and reflection within and among the parties. Although the hour is late, the recent actions by the Government and the parties, if followed through with vigour, have the potential to usher in constructive actions for the next stage of Nepal's democratic transition. Since the middle of December, activity has revived on several fronts. The UCPN-M stopped obstructing the work of the Legislature-Parliament; the long-discussed High-Level Political Mechanism was set up; the first discharge of the disqualified Maoist army personnel took place under the newly-agreed Action Plan; and the Special Committee is now discussing a timeline for integration and rehabilitation of the Maoist army personnel. These developments may strengthen a consensual basis for moving forward. Last week, on 8 January, the leaders of the three major parties announced the establishment of a high-level political mechanism dedicated to resolving outstanding peace process issues, notably the integration and rehabilitation of Maoist army personnel, as well as constitutional issues. The initial members are the Chair, Mr Girija Prasad Koirala, President of the Nepali Congress party and former Prime Minister, Mr Jhala Nath Khanal, Chairman of the CPN Unified-Marxist Leninist Party, and Mr Pushpa Kamal Dahal "Prachanda", Chairman of the UCPN-M, with Prime Minister Madhav Kumar Nepal as an invited member. UNMIN has long underlined the need for an effective framework within which the peace process can be taken forward. In a third positive and long-awaited development, the discharge of the 4008 personnel disqualified in 2007 as minors and late recruits began last week. As the Council will recall, nearly 3000 of this group are persons disqualified as having been below the age of 18 at the time of the signing of the ceasefire in May 2006. After an arduous process of discussions, an agreement was secured on 16 December on an Action Plan for the discharge of the minors, signed by the Government, the UCPN-M, and the UN Country Team, and witnessed by the Minister for Peace and Reconstruction, Mr Rakam Chemjong;Chairman Prachanda; Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict Radhika Coomaraswamy, and myself. #PeaceProcess #Constitution
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
PEACE, PEACE AGREEMENT, PEACE MAKING, PEACE BUIDLING, CONFLICT, ELECTIONS, PEACE PROCESS, ARMIES, ARMED FORCES, POLITICAL PARTIES, POLITICAL LEADERS, POLITICAL SITUATION, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, CONSTITUTIONS
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2010)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 36 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: MALIKA THAPA, Auditor:
...
Briefing by Ms Karin Landgren, Representative of the Secretary-General in Nepal: Meeting of the Security Council On the request of Nepal for United Nations assistance in support of its Peace Process (15 January 2010)
Abstract:
It is three years since this Council authorized the deployment of UNMIN, at the request of the then Seven-Party Alliance and the then-Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist, or CPN-M. The Mission's election-related tasks were completed, with some delays, in April 2008. UNMIN's continued support to the peace process, in particular through the monitoring of the management of arms and armies, and chairmanship of the Joint Monitoring Coordination Committee, has yet to be concluded. The report of the Secretary-General now with you [S/2010/17 of 7 January] reflects a turbulent period, with contentious actions and statements by the parties and warns of the grave danger that the prolonged period of polarization and growing confrontation poses to the peace process. The fragility of the peace process, and the concerns that it could derail, as I reported on 6 November, remain real. In the past weeks, however, the leaders of the principal parties have demonstrated a renewed urgency in focussing on core peace-related matters. The 28 May deadline for the promulgation of Nepal's new constitution, and the need to create the conditions that will allow UNMIN's role to be brought to an orderly end, have generated intense discussion and reflection within and among the parties. Although the hour is late, the recent actions by the Government and the parties, if followed through with vigour, have the potential to usher in constructive actions for the next stage of Nepal's democratic transition. Since the middle of December, activity has revived on several fronts. The UCPN-M stopped obstructing the work of the Legislature-Parliament; the long-discussed High-Level Political Mechanism was set up; the first discharge of the disqualified Maoist army personnel took place under the newly-agreed Action Plan; and the Special Committee is now discussing a timeline for integration and rehabilitation of the Maoist army personnel. These developments may strengthen a consensual basis for moving forward. Last week, on 8 January, the leaders of the three major parties announced the establishment of a high-level political mechanism dedicated to resolving outstanding peace process issues, notably the integration and rehabilitation of Maoist army personnel, as well as constitutional issues. The initial members are the Chair, Mr Girija Prasad Koirala, President of the Nepali Congress party and former Prime Minister, Mr Jhala Nath Khanal, Chairman of the CPN Unified-Marxist Leninist Party, and Mr Pushpa Kamal Dahal "Prachanda", Chairman of the UCPN-M, with Prime Minister Madhav Kumar Nepal as an invited member. UNMIN has long underlined the need for an effective framework within which the peace process can be taken forward. In a third positive and long-awaited development, the discharge of the 4008 personnel disqualified in 2007 as minors and late recruits began last week. As the Council will recall, nearly 3000 of this group are persons disqualified as having been below the age of 18 at the time of the signing of the ceasefire in May 2006. After an arduous process of discussions, an agreement was secured on 16 December on an Action Plan for the discharge of the minors, signed by the Government, the UCPN-M, and the UN Country Team, and witnessed by the Minister for Peace and Reconstruction, Mr Rakam Chemjong;Chairman Prachanda; Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict Radhika Coomaraswamy, and myself.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
PEACE, PEACE AGREEMENT, PEACE MAKING, PEACE BUIDLING, CONFLICT, ELECTIONS, PEACE PROCESS, ARMIES, ARMED FORCES, POLITICAL PARTIES, POLITICAL LEADERS, POLITICAL SITUATION, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, CONSTITUTIONS
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2010)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 36 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: MALIKA THAPA, Auditor:
...
Briefing by Ms Karin Landgren Representative of the Secretary-General in Nepal: Meeting of the Security Council On the request of Nepal for United Nations assistance in support of its peace process (15 January 2010)
Abstract:
It is three years since this Council authorized the deployment of UNMIN, at the request of the then Seven-Party Alliance and the then-Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist, or CPN-M. The Mission's election-related tasks were completed, with some delays, in April 2008. UNMIN's continued support to the peace process, in particular through the monitoring of the management of arms and armies, and chairmanship of the Joint Monitoring Coordination Committee, has yet to be concluded. The report of the Secretary-General now with you [S/2010/17 of 7 January] reflects a turbulent period, with contentious actions and statements by the parties and warns of the grave danger that the prolonged period of polarization and growing confrontation poses to the peace process. The fragility of the peace process, and the concerns that it could derail, as I reported on 6 November, remain real. In the past weeks, however, the leaders of the principal parties have demonstrated a renewed urgency in focussing on core peace-related matters. The 28 May deadline for the promulgation of Nepal's new constitution, and the need to create the conditions that will allow UNMIN's role to be brought to an orderly end, have generated intense discussion and reflection within and among the parties. Although the hour is late, the recent actions by the Government and the parties, if followed through with vigour, have the potential to usher in constructive actions for the next stage of Nepal's democratic transition. Since the middle of December, activity has revived on several fronts. The UCPN-M stopped obstructing the work of the Legislature-Parliament; the long-discussed High-Level Political Mechanism was set up; the first discharge of the disqualified Maoist army personnel took place under the newly-agreed Action Plan; and the Special Committee is now discussing a timeline for integration and rehabilitation of the Maoist army personnel. These developments may strengthen a consensual basis for moving forward. Last week, on 8 January, the leaders of the three major parties announced the establishment of a high-level political mechanism dedicated to resolving outstanding peace process issues, notably the integration and rehabilitation of Maoist army personnel, as well as constitutional issues. The initial members are the Chair, Mr Girija Prasad Koirala, President of the Nepali Congress party and former Prime Minister, Mr Jhala Nath Khanal, Chairman of the CPN Unified-Marxist Leninist Party, and Mr Pushpa Kamal Dahal "Prachanda", Chairman of the UCPN-M, with Prime Minister Madhav Kumar Nepal as an invited member. UNMIN has long underlined the need for an effective framework within which the peace process can be taken forward. In a third positive and long-awaited development, the discharge of the 4008 personnel disqualified in 2007 as minors and late recruits began last week. As the Council will recall, nearly 3000 of this group are persons disqualified as having been below the age of 18 at the time of the signing of the ceasefire in May 2006. After an arduous process of discussions, an agreement was secured on 16 December on an Action Plan for the discharge of the minors, signed by the Government, the UCPN-M, and the UN Country Team, and witnessed by the Minister for Peace and Reconstruction, Mr Rakam Chemjong; Chairman Prachanda; Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict Radhika Coomaraswamy, and myself.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
PEACE, PEACE AGREEMENT, PEACE MAKING, PEACE BUIDLING, CONFLICT, ELECTIONS, PEACE PROCESS, ARMIES, ARMED FORCES, POLITICAL PARTIES, POLITICAL LEADERS, POLITICAL SITUATION, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, CONSTITUTIONS
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2010)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 36 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: ANG1EE12, Auditor:
...
Briefing by Ms Karin Landgren Representative of the Secretary-General in Nepal
Abstract:
It is three years since this Council authorized the deployment of UNMIN, at the request of the then Seven-Party Alliance and the then-Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist, or CPN-M. The Mission's election-related tasks were completed, with some delays, in April 2008. UNMIN's continued support to the peace process, in particular through the monitoring of the management of arms and armies, and chairmanship of the Joint Monitoring Coordination Committee, has yet to be concluded. The report of the Secretary-General now with you [S/2010/17 of 7 January] reflects a turbulent period, with contentious actions and statements by the parties and warns of the grave danger that the prolonged period of polarization and growing confrontation poses to the peace process. The fragility of the peace process, and the concerns that it could derail, as I reported on 6 November, remain real. In the past weeks, however, the leaders of the principal parties have demonstrated a renewed urgency in focussing on core peace-related matters. The 28 May deadline for the promulgation of Nepal's new constitution, and the need to create the conditions that will allow UNMIN's role to be brought to an orderly end, have generated intense discussion and reflection within and among the parties. Although the hour is late, the recent actions by the Government and the parties, if followed through with vigour, have the potential to usher in constructive actions for the next stage of Nepal's democratic transition. Since the middle of December, activity has revived on several fronts. The UCPN-M stopped obstructing the work of the Legislature-Parliament; the long-discussed High-Level Political Mechanism was set up; the first discharge of the disqualified Maoist army personnel took place under the newly-agreed Action Plan; and the Special Committee is now discussing a timeline for integration and rehabilitation of the Maoist army personnel. These developments may strengthen a consensual basis for moving forward. Last week, on 8 January, the leaders of the three major parties announced the establishment of a high-level political mechanism dedicated to resolving outstanding peace process issues, notably the integration and rehabilitation of Maoist army personnel, as well as constitutional issues. The initial members are the Chair, Mr Girija Prasad Koirala, President of the Nepali Congress party and former Prime Minister, Mr Jhala Nath Khanal, Chairman of the CPN Unified-Marxist Leninist Party, and Mr Pushpa Kamal Dahal "Prachanda", Chairman of the UCPN-M, with Prime Minister Madhav Kumar Nepal as an invited member. UNMIN has long underlined the need for an effective framework within which the peace process can be taken forward. In a third positive and long-awaited development, the discharge of the 4008 personnel disqualified in 2007 as minors and late recruits began last week. As the Council will recall, nearly 3000 of this group are persons disqualified as having been below the age of 18 at the time of the signing of the ceasefire in May 2006. After an arduous process of discussions, an agreement was secured on 16 December on an Action Plan for the discharge of the minors, signed by the Government, the UCPN-M, and the UN Country Team, and witnessed by the Minister for Peace and Reconstruction, Mr Rakam Chemjong; Chairman Prachanda; Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict Radhika Coomaraswamy, and myself.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
PEACE, PEACE AGREEMENT, PEACE MAKING, PEACE BUIDLING, CONFLICT, ELECTIONS, PEACE PROCESS, ARMIES, ARMED FORCES, POLITICAL PARTIES, POLITICAL LEADERS, POLITICAL SITUATION, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, CONSTITUTIONS
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2010)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 36 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: ANG1EE12, Auditor:
...
Briefing by Ms Karin Landgren Representative of the Secretary-General in Nepal
Abstract:
It is three years since this Council authorized the deployment of UNMIN, at the request of the then Seven-Party Alliance and the then-Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist, or CPN-M. The Mission's election-related tasks were completed, with some delays, in April 2008. UNMIN's continued support to the peace process, in particular through the monitoring of the management of arms and armies, and chairmanship of the Joint Monitoring Coordination Committee, has yet to be concluded. The report of the Secretary-General now with you [S/2010/17 of 7 January] reflects a turbulent period, with contentious actions and statements by the parties and warns of the grave danger that the prolonged period of polarization and growing confrontation poses to the peace process. The fragility of the peace process, and the concerns that it could derail, as I reported on 6 November, remain real. In the past weeks, however, the leaders of the principal parties have demonstrated a renewed urgency in focussing on core peace-related matters. The 28 May deadline for the promulgation of Nepal's new constitution, and the need to create the conditions that will allow UNMIN's role to be brought to an orderly end, have generated intense discussion and reflection within and among the parties. Although the hour is late, the recent actions by the Government and the parties, if followed through with vigour, have the potential to usher in constructive actions for the next stage of Nepal's democratic transition. Since the middle of December, activity has revived on several fronts. The UCPN-M stopped obstructing the work of the Legislature-Parliament; the long-discussed High-Level Political Mechanism was set up; the first discharge of the disqualified Maoist army personnel took place under the newly-agreed Action Plan; and the Special Committee is now discussing a timeline for integration and rehabilitation of the Maoist army personnel. These developments may strengthen a consensual basis for moving forward. Last week, on 8 January, the leaders of the three major parties announced the establishment of a high-level political mechanism dedicated to resolving outstanding peace process issues, notably the integration and rehabilitation of Maoist army personnel, as well as constitutional issues. The initial members are the Chair, Mr Girija Prasad Koirala, President of the Nepali Congress party and former Prime Minister, Mr Jhala Nath Khanal, Chairman of the CPN Unified-Marxist Leninist Party, and Mr Pushpa Kamal Dahal "Prachanda", Chairman of the UCPN-M, with Prime Minister Madhav Kumar Nepal as an invited member. UNMIN has long underlined the need for an effective framework within which the peace process can be taken forward. In a third positive and long-awaited development, the discharge of the 4008 personnel disqualified in 2007 as minors and late recruits began last week. As the Council will recall, nearly 3000 of this group are persons disqualified as having been below the age of 18 at the time of the signing of the ceasefire in May 2006. After an arduous process of discussions, an agreement was secured on 16 December on an Action Plan for the discharge of the minors, signed by the Government, the UCPN-M, and the UN Country Team, and witnessed by the Minister for Peace and Reconstruction, Mr Rakam Chemjong; Chairman Prachanda; Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict Radhika Coomaraswamy, and myself.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
PEACE, PEACE AGREEMENT, PEACE MAKING, PEACE BUIDLING, CONFLICT, ELECTIONS, PEACE PROCESS, ARMIES, ARMED FORCES, POLITICAL PARTIES, POLITICAL LEADERS, POLITICAL SITUATION, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, CONSTITUTIONS
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2010)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 36 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: ANG1EE12, Auditor:
...
Briefing by Ms Karin Landgren Representative of the Secretary-General in Nepal
Abstract:
It is three years since this Council authorized the deployment of UNMIN, at the request of the then Seven-Party Alliance and the then-Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist, or CPN-M. The Mission's election-related tasks were completed, with some delays, in April 2008. UNMIN's continued support to the peace process, in particular through the monitoring of the management of arms and armies, and chairmanship of the Joint Monitoring Coordination Committee, has yet to be concluded. The report of the Secretary-General now with you [S/2010/17 of 7 January] reflects a turbulent period, with contentious actions and statements by the parties and warns of the grave danger that the prolonged period of polarization and growing confrontation poses to the peace process. The fragility of the peace process, and the concerns that it could derail, as I reported on 6 November, remain real. In the past weeks, however, the leaders of the principal parties have demonstrated a renewed urgency in focussing on core peace-related matters. The 28 May deadline for the promulgation of Nepal's new constitution, and the need to create the conditions that will allow UNMIN's role to be brought to an orderly end, have generated intense discussion and reflection within and among the parties. Although the hour is late, the recent actions by the Government and the parties, if followed through with vigour, have the potential to usher in constructive actions for the next stage of Nepal's democratic transition. Since the middle of December, activity has revived on several fronts. The UCPN-M stopped obstructing the work of the Legislature-Parliament; the long-discussed High-Level Political Mechanism was set up; the first discharge of the disqualified Maoist army personnel took place under the newly-agreed Action Plan; and the Special Committee is now discussing a timeline for integration and rehabilitation of the Maoist army personnel. These developments may strengthen a consensual basis for moving forward. Last week, on 8 January, the leaders of the three major parties announced the establishment of a high-level political mechanism dedicated to resolving outstanding peace process issues, notably the integration and rehabilitation of Maoist army personnel, as well as constitutional issues. The initial members are the Chair, Mr Girija Prasad Koirala, President of the Nepali Congress party and former Prime Minister, Mr Jhala Nath Khanal, Chairman of the CPN Unified-Marxist Leninist Party, and Mr Pushpa Kamal Dahal "Prachanda", Chairman of the UCPN-M, with Prime Minister Madhav Kumar Nepal as an invited member. UNMIN has long underlined the need for an effective framework within which the peace process can be taken forward. In a third positive and long-awaited development, the discharge of the 4008 personnel disqualified in 2007 as minors and late recruits began last week. As the Council will recall, nearly 3000 of this group are persons disqualified as having been below the age of 18 at the time of the signing of the ceasefire in May 2006. After an arduous process of discussions, an agreement was secured on 16 December on an Action Plan for the discharge of the minors, signed by the Government, the UCPN-M, and the UN Country Team, and witnessed by the Minister for Peace and Reconstruction, Mr Rakam Chemjong; Chairman Prachanda; Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict Radhika Coomaraswamy, and myself.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
PEACE, PEACE AGREEMENT, PEACE MAKING, PEACE BUIDLING, CONFLICT, ELECTIONS, PEACE PROCESS, ARMIES, ARMED FORCES, POLITICAL PARTIES, POLITICAL LEADERS, POLITICAL SITUATION, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, CONSTITUTIONS
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2010)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 36 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: ANG1EE12, Auditor:
...
Briefing by Ms Karin Landgren Representative of the Secretary-General in Nepal
Abstract:
UNMIN's continued support to the peace process, in particular through the monitoring of the management of arms and armies, and chairmanship of the Joint Monitoring Coordination Committee, has yet to be concluded.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
SUPPORT, MONITORING
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2010)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 36 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: FIDAH SHRESTHA, Auditor:
...