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National Human Rights Commission-Annual Report 2004
Abstract:
The fourth annual report of the National Human Rights Commission for fiscal year 2003/04 is presented here as per in the Human Rights Commission Act 1997. Even though the second and third annual reports of the Commission have not been discussed in Parliament because of its absence, this report appears as a matter of information for the general public. It seeks to acquaint them with the Commission’s activities, the obstacles and problems encountered and the achievements made while carrying out its activities. The Commission had to spend the first few years in building its capacity and securing adequate resources. Now the Commission is in its fifth year of operation, and the human and physical resources it has acquired have allowed it to expand its capabilities immensely. The Commission has prepared and implemented its strategic plan from this fiscal year. Realizing the fact that it would not be possible to complete all its tasks right away at a time when the human rights sector is growing rapidly, the Commission has also identified the priority areas for the next five years in its strategy. The Commission’s five-year plan of action based on this strategic plan is also nearing completion. The Commission aims to carry it out in the coming fiscal year. The Commission was established at a time when the conflict in the country had already turned violent, and, from the very beginning, it had to face challenges in its work to protect and promote human rights. But whatever the difficulties, the Commission has persevered with its efforts this year as in the past.The main challenge that the Commission faced this year was deciding on how to settle the complaints filed at its offices regarding forced disappearances and defend human rights. Regarding the issue of disappeared persons as reported in the complaints received by the Commission, it published a list of the names of 907 persons reported as disappeared during the previous year to coincide with World Human Rights Day. The idea was to attract world attention in the hope that the international community would make positive attempts to find a solution to the problem. The Commission held discussions and corresponded with the Rt. Hon. Prime Minister focusing on the subject besides holding regular interactions with the Royal Nepal Army. The Royal Nepal Army became increasingly involved in security matters following the government’s deployment of the army with the aim of bringing peace in the country, along with the mobilization of other security agencies under the concept of unified command and the perpetuation of the law regarding control of disruptive activities.
Publisher: NHRC/UNDP Type / Script:
Annual Report  in  English
Keywords:
DIGNITY, EQUALITY, JUSTICE, HUMAN RIGHTS, SECURITY AGENCIES, FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION, HUMAN TRAFFICKING, INTERNAL DISPLACEMENT, IMPUNITY, HUMAN RIGHTS CULTURE, HUMAN RESOURCES, INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW, HUMAN RIGHTS PRINCIPLES
Thematic Group:
UNDP, (2004)
Thesaurus:
14.02.02 - Human Rights
PDF | File Size: 1.14 MB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHARMA, Editor: ALISHATHAPALIYA, Auditor:
...
National Human Rights Commission-Annual Report 2004
Abstract:
The fourth annual report of the National Human Rights Commission for fiscal year 2003/04 is presented here as per in the Human Rights Commission Act 1997. Even though the second and third annual reports of the Commission have not been discussed in Parliament because of its absence, this report appears as a matter of information for the general public. It seeks to acquaint them with the Commission’s activities, the obstacles and problems encountered and the achievements made while carrying out its activities. The Commission had to spend the first few years in building its capacity and securing adequate resources. Now the Commission is in its fifth year of operation, and the human and physical resources it has acquired have allowed it to expand its capabilities immensely. The Commission has prepared and implemented its strategic plan from this fiscal year. Realizing the fact that it would not be possible to complete all its tasks right away at a time when the human rights sector is growing rapidly, the Commission has also identified the priority areas for the next five years in its strategy. The Commission’s five-year plan of action based on this strategic plan is also nearing completion. The Commission aims to carry it out in the coming fiscal year. The Commission was established at a time when the conflict in the country had already turned violent, and, from the very beginning, it had to face challenges in its work to protect and promote human rights. But whatever the difficulties, the Commission has persevered with its efforts this year as in the past. The main challenge that the Commission faced this year was deciding on how to settle the complaints filed at its offices regarding forced disappearances and defend human rights. Regarding the issue of disappeared persons as reported in the complaints received by the Commission, it published a list of the names of 907 persons reported as disappeared during the previous year to coincide with World Human Rights Day. The idea was to attract world attention in the hope that the international community would make positive attempts to find a solution to the problem. The Commission held discussions and corresponded with the Rt. Hon. Prime Minister focusing on the subject besides holding regular interactions with the Royal Nepal Army. The Royal Nepal Army became increasingly involved in security matters following the government’s deployment of the army with the aim of bringing peace in the country, along with the mobilization of other security agencies under the concept of unified command and the perpetuation of the law regarding control of disruptive activities. As it is quite difficult for the general public to have access to the army, and since even the Commission does not have easy approach to the security agencies, the Commission experienced great difficulties in its work to protect human rights. The Commission receives reports that most of the persons who have been arrested under suspicion of being involved in Maoist activities are in military custody. When the necessary lawful process is not initiated against a person who has been arrested for a crime but is kept in detention for an extended period without even informing the family, a situation is created whereby people disappear.
Publisher: NHRC/UNDP Type / Script:
Annual Report  in  English
Keywords:
DIGNITY, EQUALITY, JUSTICE, HUMAN RIGHTS, SECURITY AGENCIES, FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION, HUMAN TRAFFICKING, INTERNAL DISPLACEMENT, IMPUNITY, HUMAN RIGHTS CULTURE, HUMAN RESOURCES, INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW, HUMAN RIGHTS PRINCIPLES
Thematic Group:
UNDP, (2004)
Thesaurus:
14.02.02 - Human Rights
PDF | File Size: 1.14 MB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHARMA, Editor: , Auditor:
...