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General Assembly A/61/374 - Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the Human Rights Situation and the Activities of her Office, Including Technical Cooperation, in Nepal
Abstract:
On 16 September 2005, the High Commissioner for Human Rights submitted to the General Assembly her report on the human rights situation and the activities of her office, including technical cooperation, in Nepal (A/60/359), which covered the period from May 2005 to 31 August. She prepared a subsequent report for the Commission on Human Rights, which covered the period up to January 2006 (E/CN/2006/107). Since these last reports, there have been significant developments impacting on human rights, which were precipitated by the last stage of a protest movement launched by the Seven-Party Alliance (SPA) on 5 April 2006. The protest movement culminated in a cessation of military operations in the conflict, the restoration of democratic rights and other important political changes, as well as the re-launching of peace talks between the Government and the Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist (CPN-M). Both parties have requested the United Nations to provide assistance in the areas of management of arms and armed personnel,constituent assembly elections, ceasefire monitoring and continued human rights monitoring. This report examines the protest movement’s impact on human rights and the resulting political changes, as well as key human rights issues which need to be addressed in the course of the still fragile peace process. It is based on information gathered in the context of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights’ (OHCHR) monitoring and investigation work throughout the country, including a wide range of meetings with authorities, security forces, CPN-M, civil society, victims and families. Since the ceasefire, staff from four regional offices of OHCHR – in Biratnagar, Kathmandu, Pokhara and Nepalgunj - and its new sub-office in Dadeldura have intensified travel to many districts and villages. Overall, OHCHR enjoyed the cooperation of the authorities and CPN-M. However, OHCHR has been disappointed at the lack of response to a number of letters to the Government and to CPN-M. In addition, the Nepalese Army maintained its refusal to provide access to documents relating to military investigations and court martial proceedings into abuses. Breaking the climate of impunity in Nepal remains the single most difficult human rights challenge. The report was submitted to the Government and to CPN-M on 4 September and both provided their comments. #ProtestMovement #TheAprilProtestMoment
Publisher: OHCHR Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
HUMAN RIGHTS, HUMAN RIGHTS MONITORING, HUMANITARIAN INTERVENTION, CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY, DISAPPEARANCE OF PERSONS, HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS, HUMAN SECURITY, TORTURE VICTIMS, HUMANITARIAN LAW, PEACE MOVEMENTS, RIGHT TO PEACE, PROTEST MOVEMENTS,, RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT, RIGHT TO SECURITY OF PERSON
Thematic Group:
UNOHCHR , (2006)
Thesaurus:
14.02.02 - Human Rights
PDF | File Size: 97 KB   Download
Feeder: DINA JANGAM, Editor: SANJIYA SHRESTHA, Auditor:
...
General Assembly A/61/374 - Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the Human Rights Situation and the Activities of her Office, Including Technical Cooperation, in Nepal
Abstract:
On 16 September 2005, the High Commissioner for Human Rights submitted to the General Assembly her report on the human rights situation and the activities of her office, including technical cooperation, in Nepal (A/60/359), which covered the period from May 2005 to 31 August. She prepared a subsequent report for the Commission on Human Rights, which covered the period up to January 2006 (E/CN/2006/107). Since these last reports, there have been significant developments impacting on human rights, which were precipitated by the last stage of a protest movement launched by the Seven-Party Alliance (SPA) on 5 April 2006. The protest movement culminated in a cessation of military operations in the conflict, the restoration of democratic rights and other important political changes, as well as the re-launching of peace talks between the Government and the Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist (CPN-M). Both parties have requested the United Nations to provide assistance in the areas of management of arms and armed personnel,constituent assembly elections, ceasefire monitoring and continued human rights monitoring. This report examines the protest movement’s impact on human rights and the resulting political changes, as well as key human rights issues which need to be addressed in the course of the still fragile peace process. It is based on information gathered in the context of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights’ (OHCHR) monitoring and investigation work throughout the country, including a wide range of meetings with authorities, security forces, CPN-M, civil society, victims and families. Since the ceasefire, staff from four regional offices of OHCHR – in Biratnagar, Kathmandu, Pokhara and Nepalgunj - and its new sub-office in Dadeldura have intensified travel to many districts and villages. Overall, OHCHR enjoyed the cooperation of the authorities and CPN-M. However, OHCHR has been disappointed at the lack of response to a number of letters to the Government and to CPN-M. In addition, the Nepalese Army maintained its refusal to provide access to documents relating to military investigations and court martial proceedings into abuses. Breaking the climate of impunity in Nepal remains the single most difficult human rights challenge. The report was submitted to the Government and to CPN-M on 4 September and both provided their comments. #PROTESTMOVEMENT #THEAPRILPROTESTMOMENT
Publisher: OHCHR Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
HUMAN RIGHTS, HUMAN RIGHTS MONITORING, HUMANITARIAN INTERVENTION, CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY, DISAPPEARANCE OF PERSONS, HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS, HUMAN SECURITY, TORTURE VICTIMS, HUMANITARIAN LAW, PEACE MOVEMENTS, RIGHT TO PEACE, PROTEST MOVEMENTS,, RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT, RIGHT TO SECURITY OF PERSON
Thematic Group:
UNOHCHR , (2006)
Thesaurus:
14.02.02 - Human Rights
PDF | File Size: 97 KB   Download
Feeder: DINA JANGAM, Editor: PRATIVASHRESTHA, Auditor:
...
General Assembly A/61/374 Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the Human Rights Situation and the Activities of her Office, Including Technical Cooperation, in Nepal
Abstract:
On 16 September 2005, the High Commissioner for Human Rights submitted to the General Assembly her report on the human rights situation and the activities of her office, including technical cooperation, in Nepal (A/60/359), which covered the period from May 2005 to 31 August. She prepared a subsequent report for the Commission on Human Rights, which covered the period up to January 2006 (E/CN/2006/107). Since these last reports, there have been significant developments impacting on human rights, which were precipitated by the last stage of a protest movement launched by the Seven-Party Alliance (SPA) on 5 April 2006. The protest movement culminated in a cessation of military operations in the conflict, the restoration of democratic rights and other important political changes, as well as the re-launching of peace talks between the Government and the Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist (CPN-M). Both parties have requested the United Nations to provide assistance in the areas of management of arms and armed personnel,constituent assembly elections, ceasefire monitoring and continued human rights monitoring. This report examines the protest movement’s impact on human rights and the resulting political changes, as well as key human rights issues which need to be addressed in the course of the still fragile peace process. It is based on information gathered in the context of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights’ (OHCHR) monitoring and investigation work throughout the country, including a wide range of meetings with authorities, security forces, CPN-M, civil society, victims and families. Since the ceasefire, staff from four regional offices of OHCHR – in Biratnagar, Kathmandu, Pokhara and Nepalgunj - and its new sub-office in Dadeldura have intensified travel to many districts and villages. Overall, OHCHR enjoyed the cooperation of the authorities and CPN-M. However, OHCHR has been disappointed at the lack of response to a number of letters to the Government and to CPN-M. In addition, the Nepalese Army maintained its refusal to provide access to documents relating to military investigations and court martial proceedings into abuses. Breaking the climate of impunity in Nepal remains the single most difficult human rights challenge. The report was submitted to the Government and to CPN-M on 4 September and both provided their comments.
Publisher: OHCHR Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
HUMAN RIGHTS, POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT, PROTEST MOVEMENT, PEACE PROCESS, RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT, STATE RESPONSIBILITY
Thematic Group:
UNOHCHR , (2006)
Thesaurus:
14.02.02 - Human Rights
PDF | File Size: 97 KB   Download
Feeder: DINA JANGAM, Editor: , Auditor:
...