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Country Programme Action Plan 2013 - 2017-Between GoN and UNICEF
Abstract:
The Basic Cooperation Agreement (BCA) concluded between the Government and UNICEF on 21 February 1996 provides the basis of the relationship between the Government and UNICEF. This Country Programme Action Plan for the period 2013 - 2017 is to be interpreted and implemented in conformity with the BCA. The results and programmes described herein have been agreed jointly by the Government and UNICEF. Nepal is a landlocked country with diverse ecology and culture. Half of its 26.5 million people live in the low lying southern terai plains, followed by 43 per cent in the middle Hills and 7 per cent in the northern Mountains. There are 126 caste and ethnic groups, and 123 languages are spoken as mother tongue. The largest groups include Chhetri (16.6 per cent), Hill Brahmin (12.2 per cent), Magar (7.1 per cent), Tharu (6.6 percent), Tamang (5.8 per cent), Newar (5.0 per cent), Kami (4.8 per cent), Muslims (4.4 percent), Yadav (4.0 per cent) and Rai (2.3 per cent). Hinduism (81.3 per cent) is the major religion followed by Buddhism (9 per cent), Islam (4.4 per cent), Kirat (3.1 percent) and Christianity (1.4 percent). Forty-two per cent of the population is under 18 years of age (24.2 per cent between 10-19 years), making investments in children and adolescents especially relevant in shaping national development. Nepal has made rapid progress, as measured by the Human Development Index (HDI)—from 0.210 (1970) to 0.458 (2011). Legislation and initiatives promoting free education have raised net enrollment rates. Extension of primary health care has lowered the under-five mortality rate (U5MR) and the infant mortality rate. Nepal received the 2010 Millennium Development Goal (MDG) Award for reducing its maternal mortality ratio and will likely achieve all three micro nutrient goals of A World Fit for Children (WFFC). Nevertheless, Nepal ranks 157 out of 187 countries in the 2011 HDI. While overall poverty is decreasing, two thirds of its children are still deprived of at least one of seven basic needs. Nepal’s Gini coefficient of 0.352 (2011) remains among the highest in Asia.Nepal’s HDI would be a third higher than its present level had past progress been distributed more evenly across society.Inequity is especially evident in terms of geography, age, gender, ethnicity, language, education, HIV status, disability, and income. Three interdependent sets of factors underpin this inequity: “policy”, including the need for adequate governance, policy, legislation, and investment; “system”, including the need for more comprehensive, accessible and quality social services; and “societal”, including the need to address social norms and practices that impact access to and use of services or increase vulnerability. #BasicCooperationAgreement #GovernmentOfNepalAndUNICEF #NationalDevelopment
Publisher: GON AND UNICEF Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
GOVERNMENT POLICY, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, INSTITUTIONS, MOVEMENTS, DEVELOPMENT POLICY, ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, ETHNICITY, SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT, SOCIAL GROUPS, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, EDUCATION, DEVELOPMENT, BASIC NEEDS, ECONOMIC GROWTH, GENDER, POPULATION DYNAMICS, EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND PLANNING, AIDS PREVENTION, GOVERNANCE, PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
Thematic Group:
UNICEF, (2013)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 1.39 MB   Download
Feeder: LUNI SHRESTHA, Editor: SANJIYA SHRESTHA, Auditor:
...
Country Programme Action Plan 2013 - 2017-Between GoN and UNICEF
Abstract:
The Basic Cooperation Agreement (BCA) concluded between the Government and UNICEF on 21 February 1996 provides the basis of the relationship between the Government and UNICEF. This Country Programme Action Plan for the period 2013 - 2017 is to be interpreted and implemented in conformity with the BCA. The results and programmes described herein have been agreed jointly by the Government and UNICEF.. Nepal is a landlocked country with diverse ecology and culture. Half of its 26.5 million people live in the low lying southern terai plains, followed by 43 per cent in the middle Hills and 7 per cent in the northern Mountains.There are 126 caste and ethnic groups, and 123 languages are spoken as mother tongue. The largest groups include Chhetri (16.6 per cent), Hill Brahmin (12.2 per cent), Magar (7.1 per cent), Tharu (6.6 percent), Tamang (5.8 per cent), Newar (5.0 per cent), Kami (4.8 per cent), Muslims (4.4 percent), Yadav (4.0 per cent) and Rai (2.3 per cent). Hinduism (81.3 per cent) is the major religion followed by Buddhism (9 per cent), Islam (4.4 per cent), Kirat (3.1 percent) and Christianity (1.4 percent). Forty-two per cent of the population is under 18 years of age (24.2 per cent between 10-19 years), making investments in children and adolescents especially relevant in shaping national development.Nepal has made rapid progress, as measured by the Human Development Index (HDI)—from 0.210 (1970) to 0.458 (2011). Legislation and initiatives promoting free education have raised net enrollment rates. Extension of primary health care has lowered the under-five mortality rate (U5MR) and the infant mortality rate. Nepal received the 2010 Millennium Development Goal (MDG) Award for reducing its maternal mortality ratio and will likely achieve all three micro nutrient goals of A World Fit for Children (WFFC). Nevertheless, Nepal ranks 157 out of 187 countries in the 2011 HDI. While overall poverty is decreasing, two thirds of its children are still deprived of at least one of seven basic needs. Nepal’s Gini coefficient of 0.352 (2011) remains among the highest in Asia.Nepal’s HDI would be a third higher than its present level had past progress been distributed more evenly across society.Inequity is especially evident in terms of geography, age, gender, ethnicity, language, education, HIV status, disability, and income. Three interdependent sets of factors underpin this inequity: “policy”, including the need for adequate governance, policy, legislation, and investment; “system”, including the need for more comprehensive, accessible and quality social services; and “societal”, including the need to address social norms and practices that impact access to and use of services or increase vulnerability.
Publisher: GON AND UNICEF Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
GOVERNMENT POLICY, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, INSTITUTIONS, MOVEMENTS, DEVELOPMENT POLICY, ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY, ETHNICITY, SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT, ETHNIC AND RACIAL GROUPS, SOCIAL GROUPS, HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, EDUCATION, DEVELOPMENT, BASIC NEEDS, ECONOMIC GROWTH, GENDER, POPULATION DYNAMICS, EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND PLANNING, HIV/AIDS, AIDS PREVENTION, GOVERNANCE, PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
Thematic Group:
UNICEF, (2013)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 1.39 MB   Download
Feeder: LUNI SHRESTHA, Editor: ANITAKARKI2052@GMAIL COM, Auditor:
...
Country Programme Action Plan 2013 - 2017-Between GoN and UNICEF
Abstract:
The Basic Cooperation Agreement (BCA) concluded between the Government and UNICEF on 21 February 1996 provides the basis of the relationship between the Government and UNICEF. This Country Programme Action Plan for the period 2013 - 2017 is to be interpreted and implemented in conformity with the BCA. The results and programmes described herein have been agreed jointly by the Government and UNICEF.. Nepal is a landlocked country with diverse ecology and culture. Half of its 26.5 million people live in the low lying southern terai plains, followed by 43 per cent in the middle Hills and 7 per cent in the northern Mountains.There are 126 caste and ethnic groups, and 123 languages are spoken as mother tongue. The largest groups include Chhetri (16.6 per cent), Hill Brahmin (12.2 per cent), Magar (7.1 per cent), Tharu (6.6 percent), Tamang (5.8 per cent), Newar (5.0 per cent), Kami (4.8 per cent), Muslims (4.4 percent), Yadav (4.0 per cent) and Rai (2.3 per cent). Hinduism (81.3 per cent) is the major religion followed by Buddhism (9 per cent), Islam (4.4 per cent), Kirat (3.1 percent) and Christianity (1.4 percent). Forty-two per cent of the population is under 18 years of age (24.2 per cent between 10-19 years), making investments in children and adolescents especially relevant in shaping national development.Nepal has made rapid progress, as measured by the Human Development Index (HDI)—from 0.210 (1970) to 0.458 (2011). Legislation and initiatives promoting free education have raised net enrollment rates. Extension of primary health care has lowered the under-five mortality rate (U5MR) and the infant mortality rate. Nepal received the 2010 Millennium Development Goal (MDG) Award for reducing its maternal mortality ratio and will likely achieve all three micro nutrient goals of A World Fit for Children (WFFC). Nevertheless, Nepal ranks 157 out of 187 countries in the 2011 HDI. While overall poverty is decreasing, two thirds of its children are still deprived of at least one of seven basic needs. Nepal’s Gini coefficient of 0.352 (2011) remains among the highest in Asia.Nepal’s HDI would be a third higher than its present level had past progress been distributed more evenly across society.Inequity is especially evident in terms of geography, age, gender, ethnicity, language, education, HIV status, disability, and income. Three interdependent sets of factors underpin this inequity: “policy”, including the need for adequate governance, policy, legislation, and investment; “system”, including the need for more comprehensive, accessible and quality social services; and “societal”, including the need to address social norms and practices that impact access to and use of services or increase vulnerability.
Publisher: GON AND UNICEF Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
GOVERNMENT POLICY, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, INSTITUTIONS, MOVEMENTS, DEVELOPMENT POLICY, ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY
Thematic Group:
UNICEF, (2013)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 1.39 MB   Download
Feeder: LUNI SHRESTHA, Editor: ANITAKARKI2052@GMAIL COM, Auditor:
...
Country Programme Action Plan 2013 - 2017-Between GoN and UNICEF
Abstract:
The Government of Nepal, hereinafter referred to as “the Government”, and the United Nations Children’s Fund, hereinafter referred to as “UNICEF”, being in mutual agreement to the content of the Country Programme Action Plan (CPAP) and to the outlined responsibilities in the implementation of the Country Programme; and Furthering their mutual agreement and cooperation for the fulfillment of the Convention on the Rights of the Child; Building upon the experience gained and progress made during the implementation of the previous Programme of Cooperation; Entering into an extended period of cooperation from January 2013 to December 2017; Declaring that these responsibilities will be fulfilled in a spirit of friendly cooperation;
Publisher: GON AND UNICEF Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
COUNTRY PROGRAMME, ACTION PLAN, CHILDREN AND WOMEN'S SITUTATION, GON AND UNICEF RELATIONSHIP, INTERNATIONAL PRIORITIES, PROGRAMME STRUCTURE, HEALTH AND NUTRITION, ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT AND CHILD PROTECTION, PARTNERSHIP STRATEGY, MONITORING AND EVALUTION, GON ANDV UNICEF'S COMMITMENTS
Thematic Group:
UNICEF, (2013)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 1.39 MB   Download
Feeder: LUNI SHRESTHA, Editor: , Auditor:
...