United Nations
Information Centre | Nepal
Changing Communities, Changing Lives
Abstract:
Siddhipur is a traditional Newar settlement located approximately six kilometers southeast of Kathmandu. Its 1.9 square kilometer area is home to 6,046 people in 1,308 households. It used to have grave water and sanitation problems: the water supplied through 52 public stand posts was not treated in any manner whatsoever and was available only intermittently. Since the water came straight from the Godavari River, it was contaminated with bacteria and unsafe for drinking. In addition, the supply of water met the demand of only half the people; the rest used traditional water sources such as dug wells, which were also often contaminated. Outbreaks of diseases like diarrhea and cholera were frequent. Another problem was that the thirty-year-old system was in dire need of repair and rehabilitation;it had several breakages and leakages and there was no proper system of management. Despite being so close to the capital, Siddhipur residents were deprived of basic sanitation facilities, too. More than 60 percent of households did not have access to proper sanitation and open defecation was widespread. Women and children suffered most: the four kichamuga, or open areas which women used as communal toilets, were in a deplorable state. Even those households with access to sanitation had poor facilities and practiced unhygienic sanitary behaviors. Solid waste management was yet another problem in Siddhipur. Straw waste generated by the traditional straw mat weaving the community engaged on, plastics and other types of household waste were disposed of haphazardly, often clogging drains and blocking pathways. Similarly, lack of storm water drainage facilities in the village resulted in water clogging problems creating poor sanitary conditions. #Siddhipur
Publisher: GON, UNHABITAT Type / Script:
Bulletin or Poster  in  English
Keywords:
DRINKING WATER, WATER, WATER CONSUMPTION, WATER LAW, WATER QUALITY, WATER SUPPLY, WATER TREATMENT, RIGHT TO DRINKING WATER
Thematic Group:
UNHABITAT, (2008)
Thesaurus:
03.05.00 - Water
PDF | File Size: 1.04 MB   Download
Feeder: LUNI SHRESTHA, Editor: SANJIYA SHRESTHA, Auditor:
...
Changing Communities, Changing Lives
Abstract:
Siddhipur is a traditional Newar settlement located approximately six kilometers southeast of Kathmandu. Its 1.9 square kilometer area is home to 6,046 people in 1,308 households. It used to have grave water and sanitation problems: the water supplied through 52 public stand posts was not treated in any manner whatsoever and was available only intermittently. Since the water came straight from the Godavari River, it was contaminated with bacteria and unsafe for drinking. In addition, the supply of water met the demand of only half the people; the rest used traditional water sources such as dug wells, which were also often contaminated. Outbreaks of diseases like diarrhea and cholera were frequent. Another problem was that the thirty-year-old system was in dire need of repair and rehabilitation;it had several breakages and leakages and there was no proper system of management. Despite being so close to the capital, Siddhipur residents were deprived of basic sanitation facilities, too. More than 60 percent of households did not have access to proper sanitation and open defecation was widespread. Women and children suffered most: the four kichamuga, or open areas which women used as communal toilets, were in a deplorable state. Even those households with access to sanitation had poor facilities and practiced unhygienic sanitary behaviors. Solid waste management was yet another problem in Siddhipur. Straw waste generated by the traditional straw mat weaving the community engaged on, plastics and other types of household waste were disposed of haphazardly, often clogging drains and blocking pathways. Similarly, lack of storm water drainage facilities in the village resulted in water clogging problems creating poor sanitary conditions.
Publisher: GON, UNHABITAT Type / Script:
Bulletin or Poster  in  English
Keywords:
DRINKING WATER, WATER, WATER CONSUMPTION, WATER LAW, WATER QUALITY, WATER SUPPLY, WATER TREATMENT, RIGHT TO DRINKING WATER
Thematic Group:
UNHABITAT, (2008)
Thesaurus:
03.05.00 - Water
PDF | File Size: 1.04 MB   Download
Feeder: LUNI SHRESTHA, Editor: ANITAKARKI2052@GMAIL COM, Auditor:
...
Changing Communities, Changing Lives
Abstract:
Siddhipur is a traditional Newar settlement located approximately six kilometers southeast of Kathmandu. Its 1.9 square kilometer area is home to 6,046 people in 1,308 households. It used to have grave water and sanitation problems: the water supplied through 52 public stand posts was not treated in any manner whatsoever and was available only intermittently. Since the water came straight from the Godavari River, it was contaminated with bacteria and unsafe for drinking. In addition, the supply of water met the demand of only half the people; the rest used traditional water sources such as dug wells, which were also often contaminated. Outbreaks of diseases like diarrhea and cholera were frequent. Another problem was that the thirty-year-old system was in dire need of repair and rehabilitation; it had several breakages and leakages and there was no proper system of management.
Publisher: GON, UNHABITAT Type / Script:
Bulletin or Poster  in  English
Keywords:
CHANGING COMMUNITY-LIVE, DRINKING WATER, SANITATION, PERI-URBANIZATION, WATER, WASTE MANAGEMENT, WATER SUPPLY
Thematic Group:
UNHABITAT, (2008)
Thesaurus:
03.05.00 - Water
PDF | File Size: 1.04 MB   Download
Feeder: LUNI SHRESTHA, Editor: YASHOHANGMARAI, Auditor:
...
Changing Communities, Changing Lives
Abstract:
Siddhipur is a traditional Newar settlement located approximately six kilometers southeast of Kathmandu. Its 1.9 square kilometer area is home to 6,046 people in 1,308 households. It used to have grave water and sanitation problems: the water supplied through 52 public stand posts was not treated in any manner whatsoever and was available only intermittently. Since the water came straight from the Godavari River, it was contaminated with bacteria and unsafe for drinking. In addition, the supply of water met the demand of only half the people; the rest used traditional water sources such as dug wells, which were also often contaminated. Outbreaks of diseases like diarrhea and cholera were frequent. Another problem was that the thirty-year-old system was in dire need of repair and rehabilitation; it had several breakages and leakages and there was no proper system of management.
Publisher: GON/UNHABITAT Type / Script:
Bulletin or Poster  in  English
Keywords:
CHANGING COMMUNITY-LIVE, DRINKING WATER, SANITATION,PERI-URBANIZATION
Thematic Group:
UNHABITAT, (2008)
Thesaurus:
01.00.0A - Political And Legal Questions
PDF | File Size: 1.04 MB   Download
Feeder: LUNI SHRESTHA, Editor: FIDAH SHRESTHA, Auditor:
...