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Information Centre | Nepal
Addressing Arsenic Problem in Nepal
Abstract:
Access to safe drinking water is one of the key targets of the United Nations’ millennium development goals and is a crucial foundation for sustainable poverty reduction. However, the natural occurrence of arsenic in groundwater has proven to be a setback in the provision of safe drinking water to millions of citizens in Asian countries, including Nepal. Arsenic was first detected in groundwater in the early 1990s in both Bangladesh and West Bengal, India. In late 1999, the Nepal’s Department of Water Supply and Sewerage, with support from the World Health Organisation, initiated the fi rst-ever arsenic testing in Nepal and discovered that some groundwater in the Tarai region (Nepal’s low-lying plains in the south along the border with India) is indeed contaminated. In response to this discovery, most agencies working in the water and sanitation sector prioritized arsenic testing and mitigation in their programme areas. To coordinate and manage these activities, the National Arsenic Steering Committee (NASC) was formed in early 2000 as a subcommittee under the National Drinking Water Quality Steering Committee (NDWQSC). It prepared the “National Interim Policy on Arsenic” to serve as a guideline for stakeholders to work in arsenic issue. According to Nepal’s national drinking water quality standards, up to 50 parts per billion of arsenic in drinking water is considered safe. #WaterSupply #DrinkingWater #Arsenic #SDGs
Publisher: UNHABITAT Type / Script:
Bulletin or Poster  in  English
Keywords:
DRINKING WATER, WATER, WATER CONSUMPTION, WATER LAW, WATER QUALITY, WATER SUPPLY, WATER TREATMENT, RIGHT TO DRINKING WATER, FRESHWATER, GROUNDWATER, HYDROSPHERE, RAINWATER, SALINE WATERS, HEALTH SERVICES, COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH SERVICES, COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES, SANITATION, ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Thematic Group:
UNHABITAT, (2007)
Thesaurus:
10.04.00 - Environmental Health
PDF | File Size: 1.12 MB   Download
Feeder: LUNI SHRESTHA, Editor: SANJIYA SHRESTHA, Auditor:
...
Addressing Arsenic Problem in Nepal
Abstract:
Access to safe drinking water is one of the key targets of the United Nations’ millennium development goals and is a crucial foundation for sustainable poverty reduction. However, the natural occurrence of arsenic in groundwater has proven to be a setback in the provision of safe drinking water to millions of citizens in Asian countries, including Nepal. Arsenic was first detected in groundwater in the early 1990s in both Bangladesh and West Bengal, India. In late 1999, the Nepal’s Department of Water Supply and Sewerage, with support from the World Health Organisation, initiated the fi rst-ever arsenic testing in Nepal and discovered that some groundwater in the Tarai region (Nepal’s low-lying plains in the south along the border with India) is indeed contaminated. In response to this discovery, most agencies working in the water and sanitation sector prioritized arsenic testing and mitigation in their programme areas. To coordinate and manage these activities, the National Arsenic Steering Committee (NASC) was formed in early 2000 as a subcommittee under the National Drinking Water Quality Steering Committee (NDWQSC). It prepared the “National Interim Policy on Arsenic” to serve as a guideline for stakeholders to work in arsenic issue. According to Nepal’s national drinking water quality standards, up to 50 parts per billion of arsenic in drinking water is considered safe. #WATERSUPPLY #DRINKINGWATER #ARSENIC #SDGs
Publisher: UNHABITAT Type / Script:
Bulletin or Poster  in  English
Keywords:
DRINKING WATER, WATER, WATER CONSUMPTION, WATER LAW, WATER QUALITY, WATER SUPPLY, WATER TREATMENT, RIGHT TO DRINKING WATER, FRESHWATER, GROUNDWATER, HYDROSPHERE, RAINWATER, SALINE WATERS, HEALTH SERVICES, COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH SERVICES, COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES, SANITATION, ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Thematic Group:
UNHABITAT, (2007)
Thesaurus:
10.04.00 - Environmental Health
PDF | File Size: 1.12 MB   Download
Feeder: LUNI SHRESTHA, Editor: ANITAKARKI2052@GMAIL COM, Auditor:
...
Addressing Arsenic Problem in Nepal
Abstract:
Access to safe drinking water is one of the key targets of the United Nations’ millennium development goals and is a crucial foundation for sustainable poverty reduction. However, the natural occurrence of arsenic in groundwater has proven to be a setback in the provision of safe drinking water to millions of citizens in Asian countries, including Nepal. Arsenic was first detected in groundwater in the early 1990s in both Bangladesh and West Bengal, India. In late 1999, the Nepal’s Department of Water Supply and Sewerage, with support from the World Health Organisation, initiated the fi rst-ever arsenic testing in Nepal and discovered that some groundwater in the Tarai region (Nepal’s low-lying plains in the south along the border with India) is indeed contaminated. #WATERSUPPLY #DRINKINGWATER #ARSENIC #SDGs
Publisher: UNHABITAT Type / Script:
Bulletin or Poster  in  English
Keywords:
ARSENIC CONCENTRATION, DRINKING WATER, SANITATION, COMMUNITY HEALTH,IMPLIMENTATION
Thematic Group:
UNHABITAT, (2007)
Thesaurus:
10.04.00 - Environmental Health
PDF | File Size: 1.12 MB   Download
Feeder: LUNI SHRESTHA, Editor: PRABIGYA MANANDHAR, Auditor:
...
Addressing Arsenic Problem in Nepal
Abstract:
Access to safe drinking water is one of the key targets of the United Nations’ millennium development goals and is a crucial foundation for sustainable poverty reduction. However, the natural occurrence of arsenic in groundwater has proven to be a setback in the provision of safe drinking water to millions of citizens in Asian countries, including Nepal. Arsenic was first detected in groundwater in the early 1990s in both Bangladesh and West Bengal, India. In late 1999, the Nepal’s Department of Water Supply and Sewerage, with support from the World Health Organisation, initiated the fi rst-ever arsenic testing in Nepal and discovered that some groundwater in the Tarai region (Nepal’s low-lying plains in the south along the border with India) is indeed contaminated.
Publisher: UNHABITAT Type / Script:
Bulletin or Poster  in  English
Keywords:
ARSENIC CONCENTRATION, DRINKING WATER, SANITATION, COMMUNITY HEALTH,IMPLIMENTATION
Thematic Group:
UNHABITAT, (N/A)
Thesaurus:
10.04.00 - Environmental Health
PDF | File Size: 1.12 MB   Download
Feeder: LUNI SHRESTHA, Editor: RAJENDRA BANEPALI, Auditor:
...