United Nations
Information Centre | Nepal
Community Perception In Post-Earthquake Nepal (July 2015)
Abstract:
Learning from major emergencies demonstrates the critical importance of two-way communication between communities and responders. By listening to people’s needs, opinions, suggestions and complaints, the humanitarian community can adapt its response to their specific circumstances and concerns. Although challenging during an emergency response, enabling the local population to have a say in critical aid decisions increases this population’s ability to be stronger and more resilient after the crisis. Funded by DFID and supported by the Inter Agency Common Feedback Project, Accountability Lab, Local Interventions Group, Nepal Scouts and Ground Truth Solutions are working together to collect feedback from communities in Nepal and provide substantive analysis to allow humanitarian partners to better understand how communities feel about the response and how to better target community needs and concerns. This ongoing process will provide critical insight, over time, on community perceptions and how humanitarian partners can adapt response efforts to address community concerns. he survey aims to gather representative results on a national basis, with the qualification that they will only be representative of some of the most affected districts and VDCs. Around 100 people per district will be surveyed, for an aggregate overall sample size of 1,400 people. At the district level, results can be viewed as indicative rather than representative due to the size of the sub- sample. Responses in this analysis are reported as weighted percentages of the total. In some cases, responses such as ‘don’t know’ and/or ‘refused’ are excluded from the calculations, thus totals used for these analyses may be different than total number of respondents. For the purposes of this survey, Janajati is defined as a minority ethnic group other than Tamang, Gurung or Newar, as those groups were separated out because they have large populations across the affected area. This round of micro-surveys collected data from 1,304 respondents across 13 of the affected districts (100 surveys per district +/-5). Due to logistical difficulties, Okhaldhunga is not represented in this survey. While the micro-surveys offer national level representation, logistical barriers make it hard to capture perceptions from people in some of the most affected areas, particularly in mountainous regions. Data collection in some of these locations is therefore limited.
Publisher: UNRCHCO Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
EARTHQUAKES, NATURAL DISASTERS, DISASTER PRONE AREAS, DISASTER RELIEF, DISASTER PREVENTION, DISASTER VICTIMS DISASTER PREPAREDNESS, HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE, HUMANITARIAN INTERVENTION, EMERGENCY SHELTER, ETHNICITY, CITIZENSHIP, HOUSEHOLDS, CIVIL SOCIETY
Thematic Group:
UNRCHCO (UNRCO), (2015)
Thesaurus:
13.02.00 - Disaster Prevention, Preparedness And Relief
PDF | File Size: 2.61 MB   Download
Feeder: LEELASHRESTHA, Editor: , Auditor:
...
Community Perception In Post-Earthquake Nepal (July 2015)
Abstract:
Learning from major emergencies demonstrates the critical importance of two-way communication between communities and responders. By listening to people’s needs, opinions, suggestions and complaints, the humanitarian community can adapt its response to their specific circumstances and concerns. Although challenging during an emergency response, enabling the local population to have a say in critical aid decisions increases this population’s ability to be stronger and more resilient after the crisis. Funded by DFID and supported by the Inter Agency Common Feedback Project, Accountability Lab, Local Interventions Group, Nepal Scouts and Ground Truth Solutions are working together to collect feedback from communities in Nepal and provide substantive analysis to allow humanitarian partners to better understand how communities feel about the response and how to better target community needs and concerns. This ongoing process will provide critical insight, over time, on community perceptions and how humanitarian partners can adapt response efforts to address community concerns. he survey aims to gather representative results on a national basis, with the qualification that they will only be representative of some of the most affected districts and VDCs. Around 100 people per district will be surveyed, for an aggregate overall sample size of 1,400 people. At the district level, results can be viewed as indicative rather than representative due to the size of the sub- sample. Responses in this analysis are reported as weighted percentages of the total. In some cases, responses such as ‘don’t know’ and/or ‘refused’ are excluded from the calculations, thus totals used for these analyses may be different than total number of respondents. For the purposes of this survey, Janajati is defined as a minority ethnic group other than Tamang, Gurung or Newar, as those groups were separated out because they have large populations across the affected area. This round of micro-surveys collected data from 1,304 respondents across 13 of the affected districts (100 surveys per district +/-5). Due to logistical difficulties, Okhaldhunga is not represented in this survey. While the micro-surveys offer national level representation, logistical barriers make it hard to capture perceptions from people in some of the most affected areas, particularly in mountainous regions. Data collection in some of these locations is therefore limited.
Publisher: UNRCHCO Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
EARTHQUAKES, NATURAL DISASTERS, DISASTER PRONE AREAS, DISASTER RELIEF, DISASTER PREVENTION, DISASTER VICTIMS DISASTER PREPAREDNESS, HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE, HUMANITARIAN INTERVENTION, EMERGENCY SHELTER, ETHNICITY, CITIZENSHIP, HOUSEHOLDS, CIVIL SOCIETY
Thematic Group:
UNRCHCO (UNRCO), (2015)
Thesaurus:
13.02.00 - Disaster Prevention, Preparedness And Relief
PDF | File Size: 2.61 MB   Download
Feeder: LEELASHRESTHA, Editor: , Auditor:
...
Community Perception In Post-Earthquake Nepal (July 2015)
Abstract:
Learning from major emergencies demonstrates the critical importance of two-way communication between communities and responders. By listening to people’s needs, opinions, suggestions and complaints, the humanitarian community can adapt its response to their specific circumstances and concerns. Although challenging during an emergency response, enabling the local population to have a say in critical aid decisions increases this population’s ability to be stronger and more resilient after the crisis. Funded by DFID and supported by the Inter Agency Common Feedback Project, Accountability Lab, Local Intererventions Group, Nepal Scouts and Ground Truth Solutions are working together to collect feedback from communities in Nepal and provide substantive analysis to allow humanitarian partners to better understand how communities feel about the response and how to better target community needs and concerns. This ongoing process will provide critical insight, over time, on community perceptions and how humanitarian partners can adapt response efforts to address community concerns. he survey aims to gather representative results on a national basis, with the qualification that they will only be representative of some of the most affected districts and VDCs. Around 100 people per district will be surveyed, for an aggregate overall sample size of 1,400 people. At the district level, results can be viewed as indicative rather than representative due to the size of the sub- sample. Responses in this analysis are reported as weighted percentages of the total. In some cases, responses such as ‘don’t know’ and/or ‘refused’ are excluded from the calculations, thus totals used for these analyses may be different than total number of respondents. For the purposes of this survey, Janajati is defined as a minority ethnic group other than Tamang, Gurung or Newar, as those groups were separated out because they have large populations across the affected area. This round of micro-surveys collected data from 1,304 respondents across 13 of the affected districts (100 surveys per district +/-5). Due to logistical difficulties, Okhaldhunga is not represented in this survey. While the micro-surveys offer national level representation, logistical barriers make it hard to capture perceptions from people in some of the most affected areas, particularly in mountainous regions. Data collection in some of these locations is therefore limited.
Publisher: UNRCHCO Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
EARTHQUAKES, NATURAL DISASTERS, DISASTER PRONE AREAS, DISASTER RELIEF, DISASTER PREVENTION, DISASTER VICTIMS DISASTER PREPAREDNESS, HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE, HUMANITARIAN INTERVENTION, EMERGENCY SHELTER, ETHNICITY, CITIZENSHIP, HOUSEHOLDS, CIVIL SOCIETY
Thematic Group:
UNRCHCO (UNRCO), (2015)
Thesaurus:
13.02.00 - Disaster Prevention, Preparedness And Relief
PDF | File Size: 2.61 MB   Download
Feeder: LEELASHRESTHA, Editor: , Auditor:
...
Community Perception In Post-Earthquake Nepal (July 2015)
Abstract:
Learning from major emergencies demonstrates the critical importance of two-way communication between communities and responders. By listening to people’s needs, opinions, suggestions and complaints, the humanitarian community can adapt its response to their specific circumstances and concerns. Although challenging during an emergency response, enabling the local population to have a say in critical aid decisions increases this population’s ability to be stronger and more resilient after the crisis. Funded by DFID and supported by the Inter Agency Common Feedback Project, Accountability Lab, Local Interventions Group, Nepal Scouts and Ground Truth Solutions are working together to collect feedback from communities in Nepal and provide substantive analysis to allow humanitarian partners to better understand how communities feel about the response and how to better target community needs and concerns. This ongoing process will provide critical insight, over time, on community perceptions and how humanitarian partners can adapt response efforts to address community concerns. he survey aims to gather representative results on a national basis, with the qualification that they will only be representative of some of the most affected districts and VDCs. Around 100 people per district will be surveyed, for an aggregate overall sample size of 1,400 people. At the district level, results can be viewed as indicative rather than representative due to the size of the sub- sample. Responses in this analysis are reported as weighted percentages of the total. In some cases, responses such as ‘don’t know’ and/or ‘refused’ are excluded from the calculations, thus totals used for these analyses may be different than total number of respondents. For the purposes of this survey, Janajati is defined as a minority ethnic group other than Tamang, Gurung or Newar, as those groups were separated out because they have large populations across the affected area. This round of micro-surveys collected data from 1,304 respondents across 13 of the affected districts (100 surveys per district +/-5). Due to logistical difficulties, Okhaldhunga is not represented in this survey. While the micro-surveys offer national level representation, logistical barriers make it hard to capture perceptions from people in some of the most affected areas, particularly in mountainous regions. Data collection in some of these locations is therefore limited.
Publisher: UNRCHCO Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
EARTHQUAKES, NATURAL DISASTERS, DISASTER PRONE AREAS, DISASTER RELIEF, DISASTER PREVENTION, DISASTER VICTIMS DISASTER PREPAREDNESS, HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE, HUMANITARIAN INTERVENTION, EMERGENCY SHELTER, ETHNICITY, CITIZENSHIP, HOUSEHOLDS, CIVIL SOCIETY
Thematic Group:
UNRCHCO (UNRCO), (2015)
Thesaurus:
13.02.00 - Disaster Prevention, Preparedness And Relief
PDF | File Size: 2.61 MB   Download
Feeder: LEELASHRESTHA, Editor: , Auditor:
...
Community Perception In Post-Earthquake Nepal (JULY 2015)
Abstract:
Learning from major emergencies demonstrates the critical importance of two-way communication between communities and responders. By listening to people’s needs, opinions, suggestions and complaints, the humanitarian community can adapt its response to their specific circumstances and concerns. Although challenging during an emergency response, enabling the local population to have a say in critical aid decisions increases this population’s ability to be stronger and more resilient after the crisis. Funded by DFID and supported by the Inter Agency Common Feedback Project, Accountability Lab, Local Interventions Group, Nepal Scouts and Ground Truth Solutions are working together to collect feedback from communities in Nepal and provide substantive analysis to allow humanitarian partners to better understand how communities feel about the response and how to better target community needs and concerns. This ongoing process will provide critical insight, over time, on community perceptions and how humanitarian partners can adapt response efforts to address community concerns. he survey aims to gather representative results on a national basis, with the qualification that they will only be representative of some of the most affected districts and VDCs. Around 100 people per district will be surveyed, for an aggregate overall sample size of 1,400 people. At the district level, results can be viewed as indicative rather than representative due to the size of the sub- sample. Responses in this analysis are reported as weighted percentages of the total. In some cases, responses such as ‘don’t know’ and/or ‘refused’ are excluded from the calculations, thus totals used for these analyses may be different than total number of respondents. For the purposes of this survey, Janajati is defined as a minority ethnic group other than Tamang, Gurung or Newar, as those groups were separated out because they have large populations across the affected area. This round of micro-surveys collected data from 1,304 respondents across 13 of the affected districts (100 surveys per district +/-5). Due to logistical difficulties, Okhaldhunga is not represented in this survey. While the micro-surveys offer national level representation, logistical barriers make it hard to capture perceptions from people in some of the most affected areas, particularly in mountainous regions. Data collection in some of these locations is therefore limited.
Publisher: UNRCHCO Type / Script:
Progress Report  in  English
Keywords:
EARTHQUAKES, NATURAL DISASTERS, DISASTER PRONE AREAS, DISASTER RELIEF, DISASTER PREVENTION, DISASTER VICTIMS DISASTER PREPAREDNESS, HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE, HUMANITARIAN INTERVENTION, EMERGENCY SHELTER, ETHNICITY, CITIZENSHIP, HOUSEHOLDS, CIVIL SOCIETY
Thematic Group:
UNRCHCO (UNRCO), (2015)
Thesaurus:
13.02.00 - Disaster Prevention, Preparedness And Relief
PDF | File Size: 2.61 MB   Download
Feeder: LEELASHRESTHA, Editor: , Auditor:
...