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Ian Martin Special Representative of Secretary-General in Nepal Address at Talk Programme Organised by Human Rights Home, Kathmandu (13 December 2007)
Abstract:
Let me say I am very pleased indeed to be on the platform of the Human Rights Home which was established while I was Representative of the High Commissioner of Human Rights. We saw it then as an extremely important initiative and wanted to do all we could to support and encourage it, and it was particularly my colleague here, John Tyynela, who ensured that we did that. It is good to see your activities developing further. I particularly welcome this meeting because I very much want to increase the engagement of UNMIN with civil society, so that we can discuss together our respective roles in Nepal’s peace process. I have on occasion convened some discussions with civil society myself, but it is always hard to know exactly who to invite and this is the best way for it to happen, by civil society asking UNMIN to come and discuss its role with you. I want to give you briefly this afternoon an accounting of what UNMIN has done so far, which I think has to be judged in relation to what UNMIN was asked to do. It is always important to remember that Nepal’s peace process is a Nepali process, which was not mediated by the United Nations or any other third party and which is in the hands of Nepal’s political leaders, not of the international community. The second role was that the United Nations would monitor the management of arms and armies, both in respect of the Maoist army and the Nepal Army. And I want to say that there are not many conflicts around the world where one-and-half years after the ceasefire, we can say that there have been absolutely no military clashes between the two sides that had fought each other for ten years. Of course, that is thanks to the discipline of the two armies, but it also because the arms monitoring has been the only part of the peace agreements where there has been an effective implementation body, the Joint Monitoring Coordination Committee. Since last December the JMCC has met 57 times, that’s an average of once a week. At least - more than once a week. I think now we take it for granted that the two armies remain apart, but I think you will remember some of the tension that there was before the JMCC existed. And, we hope now that we are going forward with a new political consensus amongst the political actors, but if there is political tension then the relationship of cooperation that the United Nations has established with the two armies and between the two armies would be extremely important again.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
CONSTITUTIONS, PEACE, PEACE AGREEMENT, PEACE MAKING, ELECTIONS, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, POLITICAL SITUATION, POLITICAL PARTIES, POLITICAL PARTICIPATION, POLITICAL COOPERATION, POLITICAL MOVEMENTS, POLITICAL OPPOSITION, JOURNALISTS, HUMAN RIGHTS, FREEDOM, RIGHT TO INFORMATION, PEACE PROCESS, CIVIL SOCIETY, ARMIES, ARMED FORCES, CEASEFIRES
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2007)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 113 KB   Download
Feeder: PALLAVITHAPA83@GMAIL COM, Editor: ANG1EE12, Auditor:
...
Ian Martin Special Representative of Secretary-General in Nepal Address at Talk Programme Organised by Human Rights Home, Kathmandu (13 December 2007)
Abstract:
Let me say I am very pleased indeed to be on the platform of the Human Rights Home which was established while I was Representative of the High Commissioner of Human Rights. We saw it then as an extremely important initiative and wanted to do all we could to support and encourage it, and it was particularly my colleague here, John Tyynela, who ensured that we did that. It is good to see your activities developing further. I particularly welcome this meeting because I very much want to increase the engagement of UNMIN with civil society, so that we can discuss together our respective roles in Nepal’s peace process. I have on occasion convened some discussions with civil society myself, but it is always hard to know exactly who to invite and this is the best way for it to happen, by civil society asking UNMIN to come and discuss its role with you. I want to give you briefly this afternoon an accounting of what UNMIN has done so far, which I think has to be judged in relation to what UNMIN was asked to do. It is always important to remember that Nepal’s peace process is a Nepali process, which was not mediated by the United Nations or any other third party and which is in the hands of Nepal’s political leaders, not of the international community. The second role was that the United Nations would monitor the management of arms and armies, both in respect of the Maoist army and the Nepal Army. And I want to say that there are not many conflicts around the world where one-and-half years after the ceasefire, we can say that there have been absolutely no military clashes between the two sides that had fought each other for ten years. Of course, that is thanks to the discipline of the two armies, but it also because the arms monitoring has been the only part of the peace agreements where there has been an affective implementation body, the Joint Monitoring Coordination Committee. Since last December the JMCC has met 57 times, that’s an average of once a week. At least - more than once a week. I think now we take it for granted that the two armies remain apart, but I think you will remember some of the tension that there was before the JMCC existed. And, we hope now that we are going forward with a new political consensus amongst the political actors, but if there is political tension then the relationship of cooperation that the United Nations has established with the two armies and between the two armies would be extremely important again.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
CONSTITUTIONS, PEACE, PEACE AGREEMENT, PEACE MAKING, ELECTIONS, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, POLITICAL SITUATION, POLITICAL PARTIES, POLITICAL PARTICIPATION, POLITICAL COOPERATION, POLITICAL MOVEMENTS, POLITICAL OPPOSITION, JOURNALISTS, HUMAN RIGHTS, FREEDOM, RIGHT TO INFORMATION, PEACE PROCESS, CIVIL SOCIETY, ARMIES, ARMED FORCES, CEASEFIRE
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2007)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 113 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: ANG1EE12, Auditor:
...
Ian Martin Special Representative of Secretary-General in Nepal Address at Talk Programme Organised by Human Rights Home, Kathmandu
Abstract:
Let me say I am very pleased indeed to be on the platform of the Human Rights Home which was established while I was Representative of the High Commissioner of Human Rights. We saw it then as an extremely important initiative and wanted to do all we could to support and encourage it, and it was particularly my colleague here, John Tyynela, who ensured that we did that. It is good to see your activities developing further. I particularly welcome this meeting because I very much want to increase the engagement of UNMIN with civil society, so that we can discuss together our respective roles in Nepal’s peace process. I have on occasion convened some discussions with civil society myself, but it is always hard to know exactly who to invite and this is the best way for it to happen, by civil society asking UNMIN to come and discuss its role with you. I want to give you briefly this afternoon an accounting of what UNMIN has done so far, which I think has to be judged in relation to what UNMIN was asked to do. It is always important to remember that Nepal’s peace process is a Nepali process, which was not mediated by the United Nations or any other third party and which is in the hands of Nepal’s political leaders, not of the international community. The second role was that the United Nations would monitor the management of arms and armies, both in respect of the Maoist army and the Nepal Army. And I want to say that there are not many conflicts around the world where one-and-half years after the ceasefire, we can say that there have been absolutely no military clashes between the two sides that had fought each other for ten years. Of course, that is thanks to the discipline of the two armies, but it also because the arms monitoring has been the only part of the peace agreements where there has been an affective implementation body, the Joint Monitoring Coordination Committee. Since last December the JMCC has met 57 times, that’s an average of once a week. At least - more than once a week. I think now we take it for granted that the two armies remain apart, but I think you will remember some of the tension that there was before the JMCC existed. And, we hope now that we are going forward with a new political consensus amongst the political actors, but if there is political tension then the relationship of cooperation that the United Nations has established with the two armies and between the two armies would be extremely important again.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
CONSTITUTIONS, PEACE, PEACE AGREEMENT, PEACE MAKING, ELECTIONS, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, POLITICAL SITUATION, POLITICAL PARTIES, POLITICAL PARTICIPATION, POLITICAL COOPERATION, POLITICAL MOVEMENTS, POLITICAL OPPOSITION, JOURNALISTS, CIVIC EDUCATION, HUMAN RIGHTS, FREEDOM, RIGHT TO INFORMATION, PEACE PROCESS, CIVIL SOCIETY, ARMIES, ARMED FORCES, CEASEFIRE
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2007)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 113 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: ANG1EE12, Auditor:
...
Ian Martin Special Representative of Secretary-General in Nepal Address at Talk Programme Organised by Human Rights Home, Kathmandu
Abstract:
Let me say I am very pleased indeed to be on the platform of the Human Rights Home which was established while I was Representative of the High Commissioner of Human Rights. We saw it then as an extremely important initiative and wanted to do all we could to support and encourage it, and it was particularly my colleague here, John Tyynela, who ensured that we did that. It is good to see your activities developing further. I particularly welcome this meeting because I very much want to increase the engagement of UNMIN with civil society, so that we can discuss together our respective roles in Nepal’s peace process. I have on occasion convened some discussions with civil society myself, but it is always hard to know exactly who to invite and this is the best way for it to happen, by civil society asking UNMIN to come and discuss its role with you. I want to give you briefly this afternoon an accounting of what UNMIN has done so far, which I think has to be judged in relation to what UNMIN was asked to do. It is always important to remember that Nepal’s peace process is a Nepali process, which was not mediated by the United Nations or any other third party and which is in the hands of Nepal’s political leaders, not of the international community. The second role was that the United Nations would monitor the management of arms and armies, both in respect of the Maoist army and the Nepal Army. And I want to say that there are not many conflicts around the world where one-and-half years after the ceasefire, we can say that there have been absolutely no military clashes between the two sides that had fought each other for ten years. Of course, that is thanks to the discipline of the two armies, but it also because the arms monitoring has been the only part of the peace agreements where there has been an affective implementation body, the Joint Monitoring Coordination Committee. Since last December the JMCC has met 57 times, that’s an average of once a week. At least - more than once a week. I think now we take it for granted that the two armies remain apart, but I think you will remember some of the tension that there was before the JMCC existed. And, we hope now that we are going forward with a new political consensus amongst the political actors, but if there is political tension then the relationship of cooperation that the United Nations has established with the two armies and between the two armies would be extremely important again.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
CONSTITUTIONS, PEACE, PEACE AGREEMENT, PEACE MAKING, ELECTIONS, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, POLITICAL SITUATION, POLITICAL PARTIES, POLITICAL PARTICIPATION, POLITICAL COOPERATION, POLITICAL MOVEMENTS, POLITICAL OPPOSITION, JOURNALISTS, CIVIC EDUCATION, HUMAN RIGHTS, FREEDOM, RIGHT TO INFORMATION, PEACE PROCESS, CIVIL SOCIETY, ARMIES, ARMED FORCES, CEASEFIRE
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2007)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 113 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: ANG1EE12, Auditor:
...
Ian Martin Special Representative of Secretary-General in Nepal Address at Talk Programme Organised by Human Rights Home, Kathmandu
Abstract:
Let me say I am very pleased indeed to be on the platform of the Human Rights Home which was established while I was Representative of the High Commissioner of Human Rights. We saw it then as an extremely important initiative and wanted to do all we could to support and encourage it, and it was particularly my colleague here, John Tyynela, who ensured that we did that. It is good to see your activities developing further. I particularly welcome this meeting because I very much want to increase the engagement of UNMIN with civil society, so that we can discuss together our respective roles in Nepal’s peace process. I have on occasion convened some discussions with civil society myself, but it is always hard to know exactly who to invite and this is the best way for it to happen, by civil society asking UNMIN to come and discuss its role with you. I want to give you briefly this afternoon an accounting of what UNMIN has done so far, which I think has to be judged in relation to what UNMIN was asked to do. It is always important to remember that Nepal’s peace process is a Nepali process, which was not mediated by the United Nations or any other third party and which is in the hands of Nepal’s political leaders, not of the international community. The second role was that the United Nations would monitor the management of arms and armies, both in respect of the Maoist army and the Nepal Army. And I want to say that there are not many conflicts around the world where one-and-half years after the ceasefire, we can say that there have been absolutely no military clashes between the two sides that had fought each other for ten years. Of course, that is thanks to the discipline of the two armies, but it also because the arms monitoring has been the only part of the peace agreements where there has been an affective implementation body, the Joint Monitoring Coordination Committee. Since last December the JMCC has met 57 times, that’s an average of once a week. At least - more than once a week. I think now we take it for granted that the two armies remain apart, but I think you will remember some of the tension that there was before the JMCC existed. And, we hope now that we are going forward with a new political consensus amongst the political actors, but if there is political tension then the relationship of cooperation that the United Nations has established with the two armies and between the two armies would be extremely important again.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
CONSTITUTIONS, PEACE, PEACE AGREEMENT, PEACE MAKING, ELECTIONS, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, POLITICAL SITUATION, POLITICAL PARTIES, POLITICAL PARTICIPATION, POLITICAL COOPERATION, POLITICAL MOVEMENTS, POLITICAL OPPOSITION, JOURNALISTS, CIVIC EDUCATION, HUMAN RIGHTS, FREEDOM, RIGHT TO INFORMATION, PEACE PROCESS, CIVIL SOCIETY, ARMIES, ARMED FORCES, CEASEFIRE
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2007)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 113 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: ANG1EE12, Auditor:
...
Ian Martin Special Representative of Secretary-General in Nepal Address at Talk Programme Organised by Human Rights Home, Kathmandu
Abstract:
Let me say I am very pleased indeed to be on the platform of the Human Rights Home which was established while I was Representative of the High Commissioner of Human Rights. We saw it then as an extremely important initiative and wanted to do all we could to support and encourage it, and it was particularly my colleague here, John Tyynela, who ensured that we did that. It is good to see your activities developing further. I particularly welcome this meeting because I very much want to increase the engagement of UNMIN with civil society, so that we can discuss together our respective roles in Nepal’s peace process. I have on occasion convened some discussions with civil society myself, but it is always hard to know exactly who to invite and this is the best way for it to happen, by civil society asking UNMIN to come and discuss its role with you. I want to give you briefly this afternoon an accounting of what UNMIN has done so far, which I think has to be judged in relation to what UNMIN was asked to do. It is always important to remember that Nepal’s peace process is a Nepali process, which was not mediated by the United Nations or any other third party and which is in the hands of Nepal’s political leaders, not of the international community. The second role was that the United Nations would monitor the management of arms and armies, both in respect of the Maoist army and the Nepal Army. And I want to say that there are not many conflicts around the world where one-and-half years after the ceasefire, we can say that there have been absolutely no military clashes between the two sides that had fought each other for ten years. Of course, that is thanks to the discipline of the two armies, but it also because the arms monitoring has been the only part of the peace agreements where there has been an affective implementation body, the Joint Monitoring Coordination Committee. Since last December the JMCC has met 57 times, that’s an average of once a week. At least - more than once a week. I think now we take it for granted that the two armies remain apart, but I think you will remember some of the tension that there was before the JMCC existed. And, we hope now that we are going forward with a new political consensus amongst the political actors, but if there is political tension then the relationship of cooperation that the United Nations has established with the two armies and between the two armies would be extremely important again.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
CONSTITUTIONS, PEACE, PEACE AGREEMENT, PEACE MAKING, ELECTIONS, POLITICAL CONDITIONS, POLITICAL SITUATION, POLITICAL PARTIES, POLITICAL PARTICIPATION, POLITICAL COOPERATION, POLITICAL MOVEMENTS, POLITICAL OPPOSITION, JOURNALISTS, CIVIC EDUCATION, HUMAN RIGHTS, FREEDOM, MASS MEDIA, RIGHT TO INFORMATION, PEACE PROCESS, CIVIL SOCIETY
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2007)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 113 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: ANG1EE12, Auditor:
...
Ian Martin Special Representative of Secretary-General in Nepal Address at Talk Programme Organised by Human Rights Home, Kathmandu
Abstract:
It is good to see your activities developing further. I particularly welcome this meeting because I very much want to increase the engagement of UNMIN with civil society, so that we can discuss together our respective roles in Nepal’s peace process. I have on occasion convened some discussions with civil society myself, but it is always hard to know exactly who to invite and this is the best way for it to happen, by civil society asking UNMIN to come and discuss its role with you.
Publisher: UNMIN Type / Script:
Press Release  in  English
Keywords:
CIVIL SOCIETY, PEACE PROCESS
Thematic Group:
UNMIN, (2007)
Thesaurus:
01.01.00 - Political Conditions, Institutions, Movements
PDF | File Size: 113 KB   Download
Feeder: ANJANA SHRESTHA, Editor: FIDAH SHRESTHA, Auditor:
...